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course is a live activity where the learner participates in person. A course is planned as an individual event. Examples: annual meeting, conference, seminar.

For events with multiple sessions, such as annual meetings, accredited providers report one activity and calculate the hours of instruction by totaling the hours of all educational sessions offered for credit. To calculate the numbers of learners, accredited providers report the number of learners registered for the overall event. Accredited providers are not required to calculate learner totals from the individual sessions.

If a course is held multiple times for multiple audiences, then each instance is reported as a separate activity.

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What kind of activity types can be reported in PARS?

 

An internet enduring material activity is available when the learner chooses to complete it.  It is “enduring,” meaning that there is not just one time on one day to participate in it.  Rather, the learner determines when he/she participates. (Examples: online interactive educational module, recorded presentation, podcast).

Internet enduring material activities should be reported in PARS for each year in which they are active, either for the entire year or any part thereof. For each year that you provided the activity, please report the number of learners who participated in it during that year, as well as the income and expense related to the activity for that year. Do not report cumulative data for an activity spanning multiple years.

When reporting the number of learners for an internet enduring material activity, you should count all learners who completed all or a portion of the activity and whose participation can be verified in some manner. The accreditor would not consider individuals that only downloaded or accessed the activity but did not actually complete all or a portion of it to be learners.

Related FAQs:
What kind of activity types can be reported in PARS?

 

An enduring material is a printed, recorded, or computer-presented activity that may be used over time at various locations and which, in itself, constitutes a planned activity. In an enduring material the provider creates the content.

Enduring materials should be reported in PARS for each year in which they are active, either for the entire year or any part thereof. For each year that you provided the activity, please report the number of learners who participated in it during that year, as well as the income and expense related to the activity for that year.  Do not report cumulative data for an activity spanning multiple years.

When reporting the number of learners for an enduring material activity, you should count all learners who completed all or a portion of the activity and whose participation can be verified in some manner.  The accreditor would not consider individuals that only received the enduring material activity but did not actually complete all or a portion of it to be learners.

Related FAQs:
What kind of activity types can be reported in PARS?

An important concept in PARS is that of “open” and “closed” activities. Open activities are those that have a minimum set of data entered for them: specifically, activity name, activity type, activity date, and, if applicable, location. Once these data about an activity are entered, the activity is “open”, and is saved to the database. Closed activities are those activities for which all required information has been entered. For example, in order for an activity to be considered “closed”, a provider must enter data about the hours of instruction, physician and other learners, providership, whether  commercial support was received, and if it was, how much was received and from how many supporters. Once all required fields for an activity contain data, PARS considers the activity “closed”. 

Hours of instruction and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ designated may be the same or may be different. Please refer to the American Medical Association’s web site for information about how credit should be designated for CME activities.

A journal-based activity includes the reading of an article (or adapted formats for special needs), a provider stipulated/learner directed phase (that may include reflection, discussion, or debate about the material contained in the article(s)) and a requirement for the completion by the learner of a pre-determined set of questions or tasks relating to the content of the material as part of the learning process.

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How do I report report journal-based activities in PARS?
What kind of activity types can be reported in PARS?

Learning from teaching is a descriptive label for a type of activity. (The identification of activity types allows the reporting of data and information on the range of educational formats offered nationally.  This helps dispel the myth that accredited CE is mostly lecture, or didactic, in format.)

We want to assist accredited providers who are seeking to further support, facilitate, and recognize the personal professional development associated with the preparation and presentation of education. "Learning from Teaching" activities are essentially personal learning projects designed and implemented by the learner with facilitation from the accredited provider. Guidance has been provided for providers on how "Learning from Teaching" activities can be incorporated into the accredited provider’s program. 

As is the case for all activities, an accredited provider’s "Learning from Teaching" activities are expected to be developed in compliance with all applicable  requirements. "Learning from Teaching" represents a range of activities in which an accredited provider can facilitate practice-based learning and improvement – where the ‘practice’ could be the person’s professional “teaching practice” or “clinical practice” or “research practice”.

Examples of learning from teaching activities:

1.     A faculty member is asked to give an interactive skills-based workshop on “Sinusitis” designed to address medical students’ inability to evaluate patients appropriately for this condition. The faculty member identifies, through self-assessment, that she does not know the anatomy of the sinuses, does not know the pathophysiology of these processes, and does not have a personal strategy in place for taking a history regarding sinusitis or for examining the patient. Therefore, she conducts her own personal learning project to address these needs—and can then describe what new strategies she develops as a result. Also during this process, she learns several new skills associated with including x-ray images and 3D-imaging videos in her educational presentations using software tools.

2.     To prepare for teaching a skills workshop at a surgical specialty society meeting, physician faculty find that they need to learn how to operate a new laparoscopic device that will be used during the workshop. The specialty society, as an accredited provider, facilitates their training on the new device as a “Learning from Teaching” activity for the faculty prior to their teaching engagement.

3.     An accredited provider makes available a "Learning from Teaching" activity for community learner who have recently been recruited as new faculty for undergraduate and graduate school instruction in the form of "individualized learning projects" where new faculty assess what knowledge and skills they need to teach more effectively, and then makes available training and feedback to improve their teaching skills. It includes one-to-one mentorship and training with educational experts that is scheduled by the learners.

4.     In the process of revising a series of educational seminars provided each year for the orientation of new staff members, an administrator in the risk-management department finds that she has to learn and incorporate new medical coding knowledge and strategies that have been published since the last orientation she taught. As an accredited provider, her institution makes it possible for her to receive credit for her “Learning from Teaching” that involves modifications to her own coding practices while preparing for the seminars.

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How do I report Learning from Teaching in PARS?
What kind of activity types can be reported in PARS?

Internet searching and learning activities are based on a learner identifying a problem in practice and then accessing content in search of an answer from sources on the Internet that are facilitated by a provider. For the purpose of data collection, the ACCME includes AMA-defined point of care CME as a form of internet searching and learning.

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How do I report internet searching and learning activities in PARS?
What kind of activity types can be reported in PARS?

 

Test item writing is an activity based on a learner’s participation in the pre-publication development and review of any type of test-item (e.g., multiple choice questions, standardized patient cases).

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Manuscript review is based on a learner’s participation in the pre-publication review process of a manuscript.

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How do I report manuscript review in PARS?
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An internet live course is an online course available at a certain time on a certain date and is only available in real-time, just as if it were a course held in an auditorium.  Once the event has taken place, learners may no longer participate in that activity.  (Example: webcast)

Related FAQs:
What kind of activity types can be reported in PARS?

Committee learning is an activity that involves a learner’s participation in a committee process where the subject of which, if taught/learned in another format would be considered within the definition of continuing education.

Related FAQs:
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Performance improvement activities are based on a learner’s participation in a project established and/or guided by a provider in which a learner identifies an educational need through a measure of his/her performance in practice, engages in educational experiences to meet the need, integrates learning into patient care and then re-evaluates his/her performance.

Regularly scheduled series is a course planned as a series with multiple, ongoing sessions, e.g., offered weekly, monthly, or quarterly; and is primarily planned by and presented to the accredited organization’s professional staff. Examples include grand rounds, tumor boards, and morbidity and mortality conferences.

Related FAQs:
How do I report information about regularly scheduled series (RSS) in PARS?

If you provide the same activity in multiple locations (e.g., update course) or provide the same activity year after year (e.g., annual meeting), you can save time entering data about these activities by using the copy function in PARS. The copy function allows providers to select an existing activity and create a new activity that contains the same data for the following fields:

  • Activity Type

  • Activity Sub-category (if applicable)

  • Activity Title

  • Provider Activity ID (if applicable)

  • Sponsorship

  • Hours of Instruction

  • Number of AMA PRA Category 1 Credits Designated (if applicable)

  • Description of Content (if applicable)

  • Designed to change Competence?

  • Changes in Competence evaluated?

  • Designed to change Performance?

  • Changes in Performance evaluated?

  • Designed to change Patient Outcomes?

  • Changes in Patient Outcomes evaluated?

Once you copy the activity, you may modify all of the above fields in the new activity record, if needed. 

You must still enter the Reporting Year, Activity Date, and Activity Location (if applicable) for the new activity in order to be able to save it in PARS.

To copy an existing activity in PARS, visit the View Activities screen, select the applicable Reporting Year from the drop-down list, and find the activity that you want to copy on either the Open or Closed tab. Click on the copy button next to the activity. A dialogue box will appear that will require you to select a Reporting Year for the new activity. Select a Reporting Year and click Continue. The new activity record will appear. You will need to enter the Activity Location (if applicable) and the Activity Date in order to save the new activity in PARS.

Yes, if educational material from a live activity is turned into an enduring material, the enduring material is considered a separate activity.

Report any in-kind (non-monetary) commercial support received for an activity by indicating the nature of the in-kind support. You should not estimate the dollar value of in-kind support. The following are the options in PARS to describe the nature of in-kind support:

  • Durable equipment
  • Facilities/Space
  • Disposable supplies (Non-biological)
  • Animal parts or tissue
  • Human parts of tissue
  • Other